Specifications

Brand
Delahaye
Model
135MS
Construction year
1949-04
Mileage
81201 km
Fuel
Gasoline
Transmission
Manual
Color exterior
Dark Blue
Power
92 kW / 125 HP
Bodywork
Coupe
€ 230.000,-

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Color group exterior
Blue
Cylinder capacity
3600cm3
Cylinders count
6
Doors count
2
Drive type
Rear
Gears count
4
Has carpass
No
Interior color
Bruin
Is metallic
Yes
Interior color
Bruin
Seats count
4
Upholstery
Full leather

Options & equipment

Comfort

Exterior

Infotainment

Lighting

Miscellaneous

Safety

Description

Coachwork by Guilloré
Chassis no. 801186

•One of the all-time great French sports cars
•Top-of-the-range MS model
•Matching numbers
•Unique coachwork

HISTORY OF THE CAR:

A unique example, '801186' is featured in 'Delahaye – La Belle Carosserrie Française' by Jean-Paul Tissot, President of the Delahaye club (page 162).

It carries 'Alpin' enclosed coupé coachwork very similar in appearance to that of Guilloré's 'Estérel' cabriolet. (Guilloré gave names of French provinces to some of his more luxurious models such as Béarn, Dauphiné, Estérel, and Alpin).

'801186' also appeared in the October 1949 edition of 'La Revue l'Équipement Automobile' (copy entry available).
Right-hand drive like many quality French cars of the period, '801186' has the most powerful (125/130bhp) engine, as fitted to the top-of-the-range MS model, and the Cotal semi-automatic gearbox.

This Delahaye was first registered 11th April 1949 as '4359 YD1' in the name of Monsieur Francis Bonnerue of Bougival, Paris, and reregistered on 29th August 1952 as '9895 BK75', again in Paris.

In the 1970s, '801186' was one of a number of Delahayes belonging to the Dejaiffe collection in Belgium.

At the beginning of the 2000s it went to Retrolegends and afterwards back to France. Described by the vendor as '100%' throughout, this rare and beautiful French thoroughbred is offered with French Carte Grise and Netherlands registration documents.

HISTORY OF THE BRAND:

Delahaye was founded in the 1890’s by Emile Delahaye in his hometown of Tours, France. He began experimenting with belt-driven cars, and his first automobile debuted at the Paris Motor Show in 1894. To promote his fledgling automobile company, Delahaye entered famous motor races like the 1896 Paris-Marseilles in which he was also the driver. Proving his vehicles had the mettle to finish incredibly grueling rallies, Delahaye’s cars were indeed quickly noticed. Struggling to keep up with demand, it became clear that a larger facility was needed, which was realized in a deal with Emile’s customer and fellow racer, Georges Morane who had inherited an engineering factory in Paris. For almost three decades, the Delahaye Cars Company produced solid, dependable vehicles renowned for their stamina. They also produced trucks, powerboats, industrial engines and firefighting equipment. From 1927 to 1931 the company collaborated with Chenard & Walcker to manufacture medium-class cars, and two years later, Delahaye acquired Chaigneau-Braiser.

1933 marked the beginning of a new era for Delahaye, as the company began directing its efforts towards producing prestige cars and again becoming a star of the racing circuit. While Delahaye continued manufacturing commercial vehicles and other industrial equipment, the luxury vehicle became the company’s hallmark. This transition was aided by their acquisition of the prominent marque and racecar company Delage, and more importantly, with the hiring of a young engineer called Jean Francois.

Francois was commissioned to build a sports car series, which resulted in the release of the type 135, the car that would become the car manufacturer’s legacy. Developed in 1934, the type 135 went on to take victories at numerous racing events including the Monte-Carlo Rally, the le Man and the Paris-Saint Raphaël motor races. The type 135 experienced similar triumphs in car shows like the prestigious Concours d’Elegance, becoming the new darling of rich and famous.

 

A larger displacement (3,557 cc) 135M was introduced in 1936. An even sportier version, the 135MS, soon followed; 120–145 hp were available, with competition versions offering over 160 hp. The 135MS was the version most commonly seen in competition, and continued to be available until 1954, when new owners HotchKiss finally called a halt.